PREPARE TO PERSUADE

Being an effective speaker is considered a key executive competency, but it is also something of a dying art. People are relying more and more on digital communication, and studies show that listeners’ attention spans are getting shorter. Still, speaking is a more effective mode of communication than writing because vocal intonations help clarify meaning that gets lost when a message is written, and people focus their attention on the speaker.SPEED MODEL-3

McGowan finds there is a communications gender gap in the corporate world. Women have to walk a fine line between being seen as too empathetic or nice and being seen as bossy or inflexible. Men, on the other hand, do not have to deal with the same kinds of stereotypes. Women tend to back into their messages because they like to establish support for an idea before actually explaining it. Men tend to be less empathetic, so are often not as effective at explaining how an idea might help others.

But not all communication issues are gender-based. People can be poor communicators because they focus too much on irrelevant details, make the same point over and over, rely on clichés, or continually edit what they just said, a habit called verbal backspacing. To help speakers overcome any quirks that keep them from being good communicators, McGowan recommends seven principles of persuasion:

1. The headline principle: Speakers should grab their audiences’ attention at the start.

2. The Scorsese principle: Speakers should create imagery with words to hold listeners’ attention

3. The pasta-sauce principle: Speakers should boil down their messages to make them strong and concise.

4. The no-tailgating principle: Speakers should talk slowly while thinking about what to say next.

5. The conviction principle: Speakers can show certainty with their words, tone, and eye contact.

6. The curiosity principle: Good conversationalists are interested in other people and what they have to say.

7. The Draper principle: Speakers should keep the conversation focused on their areas of strength.

To learn these principles and put them into practice, people can focus on learning and using one principle at a time. Individuals can study speakers on television to see how they display various principles, and they can evaluate their own use of the principles by reviewing recordings or videos of themselves speaking.

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Maintain the Presentation Tips

  1. Ask questions every  5-10 minutes!
    1. Call on one person by name.
    2. Don’t ask the group in general
    3. When you start with one person for a question, stay with that person.  Give them feedback. 
    4. If the person you are questioning can’t answer, have them ask a classmate, not you. Make it a game!
    5. Be clear when you want everyone to follow along or participate in answering questions.

 

  1. It is easy to confuse learners with “nice to know versus need to know”.
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    TTT Session with Leading Bankers on PRISM Philosophy
    1. There is a lot of information, but lecturing on every nice to know won’t help anyone remember it.   
    2. Participants have the capacity to store everything they experience (see, read or hear).  The real issue is whether they can access the information when they need it (recall).
    3. Stick to the key points.
  2. If “nice to know” comes up, or a topic not yet covered, add it to the flip chart. Cover it at the end, or when you are on that topic.
  3. Answer questions only on topics already covered or on key points.
  4. Translate what you are presenting to its value in a daily job. Be the learner and present “What do I have to know to get it done?” Provide context and realistic examples.
  5. Make sure the entire class is following along by walking around
    1. Slow down. Check that everyone is in the right place.
    2. If someone is not, have a teammate help them
    3. Be attentive to facial expressions. If you see looks of confusion: 
      1. Ask everyone to come up with a question to ask about the subject.
      2. Have someone else answer it. If no one knows, you answer.
      3. Have someone else do a teach-back. If they don’t think they can, have them ask a question.
      4. If you see inattentiveness and yawning:
  1. Have everyone stand up and stretch.
  2. Do one of the review activities
  3. Have participants write in a notebook. Say “Write this down” when you want them to remember a best practice.  Writing helps recall.

Creating emotion helps memory. Use stories. Set up real simulations.

Repetition is the key to learning.  Let participant’s do the task many different ways

RESPECT THROUGH CONNECTION

Improving performance by learning new skills is not the only way to heighten production. Sometimes, improving performance depends upon changing the emotional atmosphere and improving employee relationships and you can learn by prism philosophy too.

When people feel connected to others, they experience less negative stress. Relationships change brain chemistry, making people less vulnerable to negativity. To foster a feeling of connection in the workplace, leaders have to set aside the right kinds and amounts of time for interacting.

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More meetings build connection and unity. They should involve talking about work, behaviors, roles, and responsibilities, so people can see the different ways their experiences connect with those of others.

We should have several types of meetings with their teams:

*Daily check-in: 5-10 minutes.

*Weekly tactical: 45-90 minutes.

*Monthly strategic: 2-4 hours.

*Quarterly off-site review: 1 to 2 days.

The most important ingredient for successful meetings is having a predictable schedule and structure.

Another way leaders can set boundaries is by creating connections. Factors that neurologically build connection among co-workers include:

*A shared purpose that is clearly defined by the meeting.

*Awareness that allows everyone to operate from the same facts and realities.

*Nonverbal cues, such as turning off cell phones, that indicate a willingness to actively engage with others.

*Collaboration in an environment where people are physically and mentally present and engaged in problem-solving.

*Coherent and relevant narratives that engage the brain more fully and illustrate people’s roles in the company story as it moves forward.

*Conflict resolution that confronts those interpersonal issues that hinder high performance.

*Emotional regulation that results from connecting with others for feedback and empathy.

*Emotional reflection that focuses on the present and leads to insight and openness within the group.

*Emotional repair that occurs in a group bound by mutual trust.

*Listening that is active and intentional so that each member of the group knows and understands the others.

High Performance Team by PRISM

If your goal is to become a high performing team then this article will help you and see what it is you need to improve.And if you attend #prismphilosophy training  (http://www.prismphilosophy.com) program it would help you to self reflect.

Characteristics of a Pseudo Team

  •  team-evolution-curveThis is a group for which there could be a significant, incremental performance need or opportunity, but it has not focused on collective performance and is not really trying to achieve it.
  •  It has no interest in shaping a common purpose or set of performance goals, even though it may call itself a team.
  •  Pseudo-teams are the weakest of all groups in terms of performance impact.
  •  In pseudo-teams, the sum of the whole is less than the potential of the individual parts.
  •  They almost always contribute less to company performance needs than working groups because their interactions detract from each member’s individual performance without delivering any joint benefits.
  •  For a pseudo-team to have the option of becoming a potential team, the group must define goals so it has something concrete to do as a team that is a valuable contribution to the company.

Characteristics of a Potential Team

  •  There is a significant, incremental performance need, and it really is trying to improve its performance impact.
  •  Typically it requires more clarity about purpose, goals, or work products and more discipline in hammering out a common working approach.
  •  It has not yet established collective accountability.
  •  Potential teams abound in organizations.
  •  When a team (as opposed to a working group) approach makes sense, the performance impact can be high.
  • The steepest performance gain comes between a potential team and a real team; but any movement up the slope is worth pursuing.

Characteristics of a Real Team

  •  This is a small number of people with complementary skills who are equally committed to a common purpose, goals, and working approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable.
  •  Real teams are a basic unit of performance.
  •  The possible performance impact for the real team is significantly higher than the working group.

Characteristics of a High Performing Team

  •  This is a group that meets all the conditions of real teams and has members who are also deeply committed to one another’s personal growth and success.
  •  That commitment usually transcends the team.
  •  The high performance team significantly outperforms all other like teams, and outperforms all reasonable expectations given its membership.
  •  It is a powerful possibility and an excellent model for all real and potential teams.

Effective Speaker

IMG_5489Being an effective speaker by using #prismphilosophy http://www.prismphilosophy.com  is considered a key executive competency, but it is also something of a dying art. People are relying more and more on digital communication, and studies show that listeners’ attention spans are getting shorter. Still, speaking is a more effective mode of communication than writing because vocal intonations help clarify meaning that gets lost when a message is written, and people focus their attention on the speaker.

McGowan finds there is a communications gender gap in the corporate world. Women have to walk a fine line between being seen as too empathetic or nice and being seen as bossy or inflexible. Men, on the other hand, do not have to deal with the same kinds of stereotypes. Women tend to back into their messages because they like to establish support for an idea before actually explaining it. Men tend to be less empathetic, so are often not as effective at explaining how an idea might help others.

But not all communication issues are gender based. People can be poor communicators because they focus too much on irrelevant details, make the same point over and over, rely on clichés, or continually edit what they just said, a habit called verbal backspacing. To help speakers overcome any quirks that keep them from being good communicators, McGowan recommends seven principles of persuasion:

1. The headline principle: Speakers should grab their audiences’ attention at the start.

2. The Scorsese principle: Speakers should create imagery with words to hold listeners’ attention

3. The pasta-sauce principle: Speakers should boil down their messages to make them strong and concise.

4. The no-tailgating principle: Speakers should talk slowly while thinking about what to say next.

5. The conviction principle: Speakers can show certainty with their words, tone, and eye contact.

6. The curiosity principle: Good conversationalists are interested in other people and what they have to say.

7. The Draper principle: Speakers should keep the conversation focused on their areas of strength.

To learn these principles and put them into practice, people can focus on learning and using one principle at a time. Individuals can study speakers on television to see how they display various principles, and they can evaluate their own use of the principles by reviewing recordings or videos of themselves speaking.

Contact us at training@prismphilosophy.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/prismworld or https://www.facebook.com/theprismphilosophy/

Active vs Passive Questions by PRISM

For Goal Setting by http://prismphilosophy.com/about/ we need to use active or passive question. Active questions are the possibility of choices to passive questions.

winners-within.pngThere is a huge difference between “Do you have clear goals?” and “Did you do your best to set clear goals for yourself?”

If you will observe and read carefully above statement, the former is trying to determine the employee’s state of mind; the latter challenges the employee to describe or defend a course of action. I, #AnubhaMauryaWalia challenge myself every day by answering 32 questions that represent behavior that I know is important, but that is easy for me to neglect given the pressures of daily life. It has helped me alter my behavior for the better in such a dramatic way that I now teach all of my clients /participants/ traines/ professional  and students this method of self-reflection for positive behavioral change. My six active questions are:

  • Did I do my best to increase my happiness?
  • Did I do my best to find meaning?
  • Did I do my best to be engaged?
  • Did I do my best to build positive relationships?
  • Did I do my best to set clear goals?
  • Did I do my best to make progress toward goal achievement?

Happy Reading and Trust me ” SET GOALS and “https://prismphilosophy.wordpress.com/2018/04/01/dreams-goals/

You can reach out to me at anubha@prismphilosophy.com or connect with me at https://www.linkedin.com/in/anubha-maurya-walia-12850018/

Using Stories in Public Speaking

Today, we will focus on Story telling in PUBLIC SPEAKING. Here are PRISM way of sharing a great story:

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Prism is a leading training company and provides soft skills, behavioural and quality training

You don’t become great speaker / story teller over-night but have to work on it.Here are PRISM way of sharing a great story:

1. PREPARE with the end in mind. Every story is a journey. Where ? How ? What ? What ? you want to share. Focus on backgrounds, experiences, motivations, and (personal) agendas. Your job is to take audience from here to there – so always know what there is. A masterful storyteller creates a framework that allows the listener to fill in his or her own gaps. The goal is to unlock the leaders’ imaginations and allow them to turn your story into their story – that way each person can relate and engage on their own terms. There are a number of proven structures for stories with PRISM. A classic example is SOAR for business cases: S: Situation and problem O: Objectives A: Actions R: Results and Implications.

RESPECT audience own conclusions. Stories can unleash emotions and perspectives, whereas explaining the story in logical terms (think sharing “the moral of the story”) does the opposite. Leave the listener processing what you said. Then they can draw their own conclusions – and that will help them get a lot more from your stories.Who do people tend to care the most about? Themselves. RESPECT same. You could create instant rapport.

IMPLEMENT emotional roller coaster. Emotion almost always trumps logic. You can designed to take people through emotional sequence. Try telling a story where the main character goes through the some cycle: shock, anger, resistance, awareness,acceptance, action and finally achievement.

SHARE a character that provides a role model. Share the story of a person who has moved forward, sharing the key steps that allowed that person to succeed. That way the story – and the main character – provides a role model everyone can follow without having to ask.

MAINTAIN the power of metaphors. Aristotle saying, “The soul never thinks without a picture.” Using metaphors in stories makes it easier for the listener to grasp the concept of big ideas. Use metaphors to help listeners draw – and remember – those connections. Humour and playfulness increase rapport.

While listeners will take their own messages from your stories, you can still guide the direction. Always remember the context. ENJOY and SHARE with PRISM. Contact us at 919818446562, http://www.prismphilosophy.com, to book session with us.